Weighing a 421

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  • #84973

    My shop just had my 421C weighed as it had been 10 years since an actual weighing. They had another company come in and weight 3 400 series Cessnas that were based there. The results look very odd to me. The right jack point was 370 lbs. heavier than the left. I would expect some difference, but not that much.

    I wasn’t there when they did it and I haven’t gone through the previous W&B yet. Does this seem possible to any of you?

    #104478

    Tom,

    We will be going through the same thing this fall. I have been advised to get every drop of fuel out of the plane (as opposed to filling the tank) as there is a great deal of variance in how much fuel actually can be loaded onto our planes. The air-conditioner is also on the right side though I do not know its weight. So if you fueled on a not perfectly level peice of ground and then weighed the plane that could make for some variance. I can’t see how it could be that high though.

    #104480
    jgrimes
    Participant

      We weighed our airplane last year and the results were off the chart. The tanks really weren’t empty and that royally messed everything up. They also use non-standard jack points which added even more error.

      Finally, I insisted we fill the tanks and weigh it at the wheels. That finally got us to something reasonable.

      Joe

      #104484

      I have a question: Why do you do this?

      I have never done this or even thought about doing it. Am I missing something?

      #104486

      My 421 was the same, one side was much heavier: the explanation is simple – the jack point on the nose, I think, is not on center! I had the shop redo it, same result, and then I realized the “issue”. (Egg on my face)

      #104488

      NEVER weight an airplane except if regulations (Part 135…) make you do it…. Empty weight & CG always should be calculated.

      #104496
      quote JODAY:

      I have a question: Why do you do this?

      I have never done this or even thought about doing it. Am I missing something?

      There are conflicting opinions on this. By 135 regs, airplanes are required to be re-weighed. Airplanes get heavier with age. Dust gets in there, calculated CGs have inaccuracies, etc. A real weight means you know what the plane weighs, not what it’s supposed to weigh. This helps ensure your OEI performance is what it should.

      Of course, if you flew over gross by accident you’ll probably fly over gross on purpose, and the legal useful load will be smaller when it gets re-weighed at a higher number.

      I’ve never weighed a plane and don’t really care to, but I understand why people would.

      #104497
      quote TDUPUIS:

      quote JODAY:

      I have a question: Why do you do this?

      I have never done this or even thought about doing it. Am I missing something?

      There are conflicting opinions on this. By 135 regs, airplanes are required to be re-weighed. Airplanes get heavier with age. Dust gets in there, calculated CGs have inaccuracies, etc. A real weight means you know what the plane weighs, not what it’s supposed to weigh. This helps ensure your OEI performance is what it should.

      Of course, if you flew over gross by accident you’ll probably fly over gross on purpose, and the legal useful load will be smaller when it gets re-weighed at a higher number.

      I’ve never weighed a plane and don’t really care to, but I understand why people would.

      OK, I get it. So if you do put it on the scales for compliance, you want the dust blown out beforehand.

      #104504
      rwelsh
      Participant

        To me, weighting a plane that is working just fine is a waste of time. Our CGs are very generous not like a competitor’s planes CG. Why make problems?

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