Listening to your engine

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  • #84111

    I disagree the way the article “Listening to your engine” in the February 2013 TTCF magazine ends:
    “In another article, I’ll write about my engine overhaul experience. What we found when we disassembled my engines further confirmed that my decision to overhaul was the best course of action”.

    I feel like not flying my 340 until that future article is published. What did you find? Am I going to have a terrible accident?
    If you found something wrong in your engines, you better tell it at once, not in a future article. You could save lives and help this general aviation to survive these hard times.

    Rodolfo
    1978 C340A RAM VII

    #98212
    bthomason
    Participant

      Rodolfo, nothing to worry about. I’ll be publishing Thom’s followup story before long. He found rust in his engines – even though his airplane was based in Arizona. Do you borescope your engines annually? That’s how you’d know whether you have any rust, short of tearing down your engine.

      #98214
      quote BThomason:

      Do you borescope your engines annually? That’s how you’d know whether you have any rust, short of tearing down your engine.

      Bob,
      Are you referring to a standard cylinder inspection using a borescope or somehow using a borescope to inspect the internals of the engine (e.g. cam face)? If it is the later, is there a way to do that without removing a cylinder? I was under the impression that examining the internal components of the engine was the only way to definitely tell whether there was corrosion.

      Geoff

      #98216
      quote COCHRANE:

      quote BThomason:

      Do you borescope your engines annually? That’s how you’d know whether you have any rust, short of tearing down your engine.

      Bob,
      Are you referring to a standard cylinder inspection using a borescope or somehow using a borescope to inspect the internals of the engine (e.g. cam face)? If it is the later, is there a way to do that without removing a cylinder? I was under the impression that examining the internal components of the engine was the only way to definitely tell whether there was corrosion.

      Geoff

      For the continental engines it is possible to remove the push rods and push rod tubes, extract the lifters, and inspect cam and lifter faces. All without removing the cylinder. A good idea on a pre-buy, probably overkill if you are changing oil/inspecting filter regularly and taking oil samples for a plane you have owned for awhile.

      You could probably stick a borescope in the oil fill port and perhaps a small one via the oil drain. This might be ok for checking cam lobes. The 400 hr starter adapter gear inspection on the GTSIO’s is good as it looks at a critical gear on the main crank.

      Can’t see bearing surfaces, other gear wear, connecting rod issues, etc.

      #98217

      It could be an easy regular inspection. But it is not. I wonder why.

      Rodolfo
      1978 C340 A RAM VII

      #98221
      bthomason
      Participant
        quote RENRIQUEZ:

        It could be an easy regular inspection. But it is not. I wonder why.

        Rodolfo
        1978 C340 A RAM VII

        When we were at the Continental Factory Service Center in February, there was a large hand lettered sign in the shop office that said, “All aircraft will be borescoped at Annual Inspection.” I chuckled. Even Continental has to remind it’s own shop to do regular borescope inspections. Old habits are not easily changed. That’s the reason most shops still don’t do them regularly.

        #98229

        No reason to panic. The point was the author found indications of a problem, made a decision to correct it, and found out that he was right – there was a problem. This is how it should work.

        The point of the article was that you need to pay attention to what your engines are telling you with roughness, etc. If you do, you’ll be able to get better life out of them and catch problems when they’re small. These engines have personalities.

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