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  • #84634

    I was looking through some files and found this. I put this together with my instructor recently and I thought some of you would find it interesting. I wanted to review some of the effects of drag flying in the approach and landing phases. We did this at 5000′.

    #101882
    sthibault1
    Participant

      Jim,
      I remember doing this demonstration with you. It usually is an eye opener for pilots when we determine:

      Table 1 – how much speed you lose when adding flaps/gear.
      Table 2 – how much power it takes to maintain speed when adding flaps/gear.
      Table 3 – how much climb rate you lose (or how much the sink rate increases) when adding flaps and gear. This table shows how your single engine climb rate will be reduced by flaps/gear.

      Safe flying,
      Steve Thibault

      #101884

      Thanks for the details Steve, that adds a lot to the tables that I left out.

      Jim

      #101908

      Good DATA Jim.

      What was your weight and what temps on the day?

      From the data it appears flaps up, then gear in a engine out situation, which is against the training I’ve had?

      Andrew

      #101909
      quote avann:

      Good DATA Jim.

      What was your weight and what temps on the day?

      From the data it appears flaps up, then gear in a engine out situation, which is against the training I’ve had?

      Andrew

      The old mantra I was taught was “Mixture, prop, throttle, flaps, gear.” Probably different ones from different teachers.

      For each aircraft, you probably need to adjust this. In the case of the 310, flaps and gear are electric. You can raise them simultaneously. Put gear in “Up” position and flaps either in up for later 310s, or hold the flap switch up (which is what our 310 has).

      Just don’t do that in an MU-2…

      #101910

      Andrew,

      I don’t know the weight but would suspect 800# of fuel and two on board. Temp – probably ~0C. And, the cowl flaps were closed and lights retracted.

      How this came up was Steve asked me what I wanted to explore, I told him I would like to look at some numbers related to drag. The sequence the data is listed is not a procedure demonstration, (ie; engine failure) just data points. We have been flying together for many years, I have had the same plane for a long time, so we typically do some things that probably would not be part of scheduled training routines or syllabus.

      Steve listed the purpose of the table data in an earlier post.

      Table 1 – how much speed you lose when adding flaps/gear.
      Table 2 – how much power it takes to maintain speed when adding flaps/gear.
      Table 3 – how much climb rate you lose (or how much the sink rate increases) when adding flaps and gear. This table shows how your single engine climb rate will be reduced by flaps/gear.

      My take-away was –

      — Takes a lot of power from both engines to maintain alt with gear and flaps down; on short final, if I need to level off or am low/short for any reason, expect to put in > 25″ or more power to stretch out the final.

      — When leveling off on a step down approach or circle to land, power back up to 25″+ to maintain a safe airspeed.

      — And, should I be totally brain dead some day, the plane can climb with gear and flaps down should I take off with full flaps or need to go around for some reason with everything hanging down.

      I suppose I learned other things too, but doing the drill is good training. I recall doing the “drag demo” when learning ME flying, but had not done this in my plane that I could recall. This was a modified “drag demo” as we had both engines running at a constant power. I know the numbers are not transferable to other planes and the temp and weight is a variable.

      Jim

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