Did you know…?

Home 2024 Forums Opening Section Cessna 303 Topics Did you know…?

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  • #85187
    bthomason
    Participant

      I was re-reading the description of the development of the 303 in Wings for the World II by Cessna engineer William D. Thompson. Here are some interesting quotes about the flight testing:

      – “The lateral control power is exceptional. Flight Test was amazed when they found the roll rate to be higher than that of a Spitfire at comparable speed!”

      – “Single engine landings with the maximum possible lateral CG (one fuel tank empty and the other full) were demonstrated successfully.”

      – “Although spin testing was not required…a 2 Β½ turn spin was performed in a one-engine operating condition.” Standard recovery technique produced a recovery in only ΒΌ turn.

      – In any condition (stall buffet) occurs before (Vmc), giving the pilot plenty of warning. Vmc is characterized as a gentle roll off into the inoperative engine.”

      – “This model was perhaps the most thoroughly tested of any Cessna twin…The results were monumental from a technical standpoint.”

      All reasons I love my Crusader!

      #105940
      Gerald T. Alves
      Participant

        Bob they got most of it right. I remember a problem with the design and ICING on the tail. There was a fatal accident in Oregon because of it. I am not sure if they ever corrected the problem.

        #105941

        That is quite impressive, especially the OEI spin!

        So now the next question: do the accident rates for the 303 show themselves as lower than the 310? That might be a hard one to determine given the low production volume.

        #105942
        bthomason
        Participant
          quote GALVES:

          Bob they got most of it right. I remember a problem with the design and ICING on the tail. There was a fatal accident in Oregon because of it. I am not sure if they ever corrected the problem.

          They did have complaints of minor rudder flutter in ice right after the airplane was launched. No mention of any accidents, but the FAA revoked known icing certification for a few months. A simple fairing at the intersection of the vertical and horizontal stabilizer solved the problem.

          #105943
          bthomason
          Participant
            quote TDUPUIS:

            So now the next question: do the accident rates for the 303 show themselves as lower than the 310? That might be a hard one to determine given the low production volume.

            I suspect they might but mainly because of simpler fuel (on-off-crossfeed) and landing gear systems (hydraulic with trailing link).

            #105944
            rtowe
            Participant
              quote TDUPUIS:

              That is quite impressive, especially the OEI spin!

              So now the next question: do the accident rates for the 303 show themselves as lower than the 310? That might be a hard one to determine given the low production volume.

              I have all (30) of the NTSB reports of the accidents and incidents, which is about 10% of the fleet. I can tell you that there were only a few mechanical causes but, most of them were pilot errors like a pilot that took (4) of his friends for a night flight in the pattern (after drinking alcohol) and landed short killing everyone, then another pilot was color blind and took off in a snowstorm with known heart conditions, fuel exaustion twice and not to mention the last accident where the pilot lost an engine on takeoff with known fuel issues(SID-97-3). I will summarize them in the next post after I get to the NTSB reports at the hangar.

              Now, Service difficultty reports(SDR’s) are another matter and I can summarize those as well.

              In making the decision to go for the 310R vs. the T303 Crusader, I studied all of this data in advance and concluded that the T303 had less AD’s, no critical engine, less maintenance issue’s, longer TBO engines, no fuel switching issues, trailing link gear and oh, did I mention the airstair πŸ˜† ….Although it is a bit slower but, we average 22-24 gph total from start-up to shut-down depending on the flight time at 170TAS…

              #105945
              sworley
              Participant

                You guys just made me look at Controller. I don’t need another airplane.

                #105946
                rtowe
                Participant
                  quote SWORLEY:

                  You guys just made me look at Controller. I don’t need another airplane.

                  I do that all the time and my wife is like, why are you looking at airplanes again? πŸ˜†

                  #105962
                  quote SWORLEY:

                  You guys just made me look at Controller. I don’t need another airplane.

                  You’re right! I can think of a good home for your 421. πŸ˜‰

                  #105964
                  quote TDUPUIS:

                  You’re right! I can think of a good home for your 421. πŸ˜‰

                  Your always thinking of me Ted – thanks.

                  Just been looking at this one..

                  http://www.aircraftsalescentre.com.au/index.php?secId=5&id=127

                  Andrew

                  #105966

                  Andrew, if you buy one in the States, I want to do the ferry flight!

                  #105972
                  quote TDUPUIS:

                  Andrew, if you buy one in the States, I want to do the ferry flight!

                  Consider it Done..

                  #107210

                  Bob, only just read your post on the T303 flight testing (I have been flying all over in various things). Very interesting information. I found a second hand copy of Thompsons book on Amazon and bought it but not cheap at $80 for a paper back. There is one other on offer at $100. John

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